The Unspeakable Practices

The Unspeakable Practices

Catalog #: JNR181    Release Date: 11/06/2015

$ 7.00  

  • The Unspeakable Practices - The Unspeakable Practices - Joyful Noise Recordings - 1
  • The Unspeakable Practices - The Unspeakable Practices - Joyful Noise Recordings - 2
  • The Unspeakable Practices - The Unspeakable Practices - Joyful Noise Recordings - 3
  • The Unspeakable Practices - The Unspeakable Practices - Joyful Noise Recordings - 4

This variant is currently sold out

Track Listing
  1. Early Warning System
  2. Gambling In Reno
  3. Neon
  4. Jewel Cave
  5. A Steadying Effect
  6. No Kids
  7. The History of Identity
  8. Of A
  9. Symptom Book (bonus track, digital only)

 

    Description

    The Unspeakable Practices is a new project spearheaded by Kid Millions (Oneida, People of the North, Man Forever, Soldiers of Fortune, ex-Spiritualized) and celebrated writer Rick Moody, a founding member of The Wingdale Community Singers and an avid music fan & essayist. After becoming friends, the two spoke about creating a music project together and rounded up a handful of diverse and talented musicians to round out their band: experimental trumpet player Nate Wooley, bassists Brad Truax (ex-Spiritualized, Interpol) and Richard Hoffman (Sightings), guitarist Shahin Motia (Ex Models, Oneida), organ player David Grubbs (Squirrel Bait, Gastr Del Sol), and saxophone player Michael Foster.

    The band’s debut S/T album, due out November 6th on Joyful Noise, was born of improvised rehearsals captured on a Zoom recorder and later fleshed out into fully-formed songs. These songs, along with new improvisations, were recorded in Queens at Colin Marston's Menegroth Studio, with Moody singing live with the band. Though his lyrics — which were derived from his poetical practice — are a significant element of the project, Moody also felt it crucial that he be an active part of the band, and not just the lyricist: “it was really important to me to be reactive with respect to the amazing musicians I was working with. It was, in fact, important for me to be IN the band, not separate from the band. Another instrument in the orchestra, rather than something fused onto the music. Not lyrics in front, and music behind, but all one instrument.”

    Browse More Goodness